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Spring Tour 2016 – Greece

Hayley C. Lemens offers an insight into her personal experience, which she gained during the tour and in many conversations with her fellow students and with people she met.    The views, opinions and positions expressed by the author and those providing comments on this post are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of the Portland Kulturprogramm or any employee thereof.

 

For the second half of Spring Tour we found ourselves in Greece after a short ferry ride from Italy. We visited many different and interesting places from monasteries to ruins to cities. These places include: Meteroa, Kalambaka, Itea, Delphi, Corinth, Nafplio, Mycenae, Epidauros, Athens, and Olympia. We all loves Greece and were impressed that we were able to visit so many places with such variety. I would love to return to Greece as the history, architecture, art, and food were all absolutely amazing! One of our favorite parts Continue reading “Spring Tour 2016 – Greece”

Spring Tour 2016 – Italy

Hayley C. Lemens offers an insight into her personal experience, which she gained during the tour and in many conversations with her fellow students and with people she met.    The views, opinions and positions expressed by the author and those providing comments on this post are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of the Portland Kulturprogramm or any employee thereof.

 

Spring Tour started off in Italy and officially ended in Italy. The towns and cities we visited were very different from each other and each had their own way of being interesting. These places include: Padua, Ravenna, Florence, Assisi, Rome, The Vatican, Montecassino, Pompeii, Vesuvius, and Venice. I think it is impressive that we were able to visit so many places across Italy. Continue reading “Spring Tour 2016 – Italy”

Spring Tour 2016

Hayley C. Lemens offers an insight into her personal experience, which she gained during the tour and in many conversations with her fellow students and with people she met.    The views, opinions and positions expressed by the author and those providing comments on this post are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of the Portland Kulturprogramm or any employee thereof.

 

Early one February morning the time had come to leave Salzburg and begin a new adventure. We were to drive to Italy and made our way south while enjoying famous artworks and a hike up Vesuvius. There we took a ferry to Greece where we traipsed through ancient ruins and enjoyed delicious food. Finally, at the end we made our way back into Italy to enjoy the canals of Venice. Continue reading “Spring Tour 2016”

Besuch auf dem Schrannenmarkt

Am Donnerstag, den 21. Jänner haben die Studierenden der Gruppen Deutsch 102 und Deutsch 202 den Schrannenmarkt besucht. Die Rechercheaufgaben der Studierenden aus Deutsch 102 kann man hier ansehen. Die Studierenden aus Deutsch 202 haben den Markt mit allen Sinnen erlebt und darüber kleine Absätze verfasst, die in diesem Blogeintrag zusammengefasst sind. Die Rechtschreibung und Grammatik wurde verbessert, aber die Inhalte weitestgehend beibehalten.

GRM 102 und GRM 202 auf der SchranneGRM 102 und GRM 202 auf der Schranne

GRM 102 und GRM 202 auf der Schranne

 

Continue reading “Besuch auf dem Schrannenmarkt”

Helfen auf dem Christkindlmarkt

Verfasst von Taryn Carroll (GRM 311)

Rotaract Stand auf dem ChristkindlmarktRotaract Stand auf dem Christkindlmarkt

Rotaract Stand auf dem Christkindlmarkt

 

Als Taryn sechzehn war, hat sie ein Austausch nach Deutschland mit Rotary gemacht.  Taryns Gastgeber war der Rotary Club Neuss im Distrikt 1870. In Deutschland hat Taryn manchmal etwas mit Rotaract gemacht, und sie hat es toll gefunden. Wir haben gedacht, dass es wird schon, wenn wir etwas mit Rotaract in Salzburg machen können. Wir haben dem Club ein email geschickt, und sie haben uns zu einem Meeting eingeladen. Continue reading “Helfen auf dem Christkindlmarkt”

Spring Retreat 2015

Composed by Kelsey Griffin and Emily Fitzgerald

The retreat started off with a lecture from a local historian who came in and gave us a one-hour lecture on faith and religion in Salzburg. The lecture covered the somewhat notorious Prince Archbishops who ruled both secular and religious life in Salzburg, the strict Catholicism that took place in the middle-ages and the brutal persecution of Salzburg’s Jewish and the Protestant population. We also learned briefly about the witch trials and witch burnings, which were awful, but compared to the rest of Europe in the Middle Ages, Salzburg was relatively mild in its witch-hunts.
After the lecture we went on a walking tour of Salzburg, . We went into some of the smaller corners of Salzburg like St. Sebastian’s cemetery, the spot where the Witching tower used to be (it was destroyed by a bomb in WWII and now it’s a Laundromat), and the old Jewish street with the old center of Salzburg tucked away behind the main squares, ending our city-excursion at the foot of the Festungsbahn up to the Fortress.

We finally found ourselves at the Fortress, the imposing icon of Salzburg. After a quick trip on the Festungsbahn, we were greeted with impressive views over the city. Fortunately, it was a beautiful day, which made the following tour through the stone building fairly pleasant.

View form the FortressView form the Fortress

View form the Fortress

 

Inside, our tour guide Leonhard showed us the incredible maze of passages and rooms, all designed with utility rather than beauty in mind. That isn’t to say the whole of Festung Hohensalzburg is drab and barren. The Fortress has a distinct Gothic aesthetic and contains some wonderful gilded rooms – which served as the Prince Archbishop’s living quarters, of course.

Students in the TowerStudents in the Tower

Students in the Tower

Marvin Experiencing the Shoulder PressMarvin Experiencing the Shoulder Press

Marvin Experiencing the Shoulder Press

 

After discovering the hidden gems of the Fortress, we were deposited in the old dining room to enjoy a typical medieval dinner, complete with warring kingdoms and a little friendly competition. Two warring kingdoms battled for ultimate sovereignty of the Center: Walli Land, led by the fearless Dr. Horcicka, and Roland Land, governed by our local history major Pearl Kahle. Throughout the meal, the two teams would face three challenges. Every round, 7 people would participate, contributing to the final score based on their success. The loser had to bow before the winner, and if one team won all three challenges, the loser would have to fulfill one wish. I found myself a citizen of Roland Land, and the opportunity to best our dear Dr. Horcicka made the dinner all the more enjoyable.

King Horcicka and Queen PearlKing Horcicka and Queen Pearl

King Horcicka and Queen Pearl

 

Our first challenge: horseshoes. Competition was fierce, but Roland Land came out victorious.

After enjoying meat, potatoes, and Knödel (a bread dumpling commonly served in Austria), our next competition took place. We had to shoot a crossbow, gaining more points the closer we scored to a bullseye. Roland Land won by one point, ensuring that the King of Walli Land had to bow before Queen Pearl. Now, we set our sights on securing the wish.

Frau Strobl Takes Up the CrossbowFrau Strobl Takes Up the Crossbow

Frau Strobl Takes Up the Crossbow

 

In our final competition, each team was forced to run a relay with one catch; one foot had to always be on a small wooden plank, forcing the runner to constantly swing it forward. It was a close competition, but, naturally, Roland Land triumphed.

In quite the spectacle, Dr. Horcicka was forced to kneel to Pearl and the Roland Landers, and he also had to grant one wish. Pearl, being a generous queen, requested that a keg of the finest Salzburg beer from Augustiner Bräu be served at our farewell barbeque. Needless to say, we’re all looking forward to our reward. Prost!